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Subjects

Subjects required for the Foundation Studies Standard (12-month) programme

English for Academic Purposes (EAP)

+ four subjects from the list below:

Subjects

  • Accounting
    • Introduction to Accounting – Financial Statements, Double Entry, Basic Concepts
    • Cost-volume-profit Analysis
    • Decision-making
    • Spreadsheets, using Microsoft Excel
    • Cash Budgeting
    • Analysis and Interpretation
    • Companies
    • Accounting Concepts for a Reporting Entity
    • Cashflow Statements
    • Job Costing
  • Art History
    • The Renaissance
      • Naturalism and Science in Fifteenth-century Italian Painting
      • The High Renaissance – The Influence of Antiquity
      • Gesture, Expression and the Portrayal of Narrative
      • Portraiture – Characterisation of the Individual
    • Modern Art – Towards Abstraction
      • The Development of Cubism
      • Paths to Abstraction
    • Aspects of Modern New Zealand Art
      • Paths to Abstraction
  • Biology
    • Cells and Biochemistry
    • Plants and Animals
    • Human Physiology
    • Ecosystems and Energy Flow
    • Genetics and Evolution
    • Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology
  • Chemistry
    • Atomic Structure
    • Chemical Bonding
    • Reduction and Oxidation
    • Electrochemical Cells
    • Enthalpy Change
    • Chemical Equilibrium
    • Acids, Bases and Alkalis
    • Dissolving and Precipitation
    • Organic Compounds – Nomenclature, Structure, Isomerism, Reactions and Polymers
  • Economics
    • Basic Economic Concepts
    • Theory of Demand
    • Production, Resources, Costs and Cost Curves
    • Theory of Supply
    • Elasticities of Demand and Supply
    • Market Model and Allocative Efficiency
    • Theory of the Firm and Types of Competition in the Market
    • Market Failure and Government Intervention
    • Circular Flow of Income and Expenditure
    • GDP and the Business Cycle
    • Aggregate Demand and Aggregate Supply Model
    • Balance of Payments and Exchange Rate
    • Monetary and Fiscal Policies to Close Recessionary and Inflationary Gaps
  • Geography
    • Geographic Skills using Topographical Maps
    • Tourism Development in Rotorua
    • Plate Tectonic Movement in New Zealand
    • Development
  • Physics
    • Linear Motion
    • Newton’s Laws and their Application
    • Circular Motion
    • Work, Energy and Power
    • Linear Momentum
    • Rotational Momentum
    • Simple Harmonic Motion
    • Mechanical Waves
    • Electromagnetic Waves
    • Direct Current Electricity
    • Capacitance
    • Electromagnetism
    • Alternating Current Theory
  • English (for Academic Purposes)

    Academic writing,  speaking, reading,  listening, research skills, syntax and academic vocabulary. Core course material is supplemented with electronic materials such as media-related reading exercises and communication activities that improve grammar and listening skills.

    Students who achieve a minimum of a B grade in EAP meet the literacy requirements for entry to the University of Auckland. They will not need an IELTS pass (minimum 6.0) for courses in Commerce (Business), Science, Arts, Law, Architecture, Music, Technology and others. Those wanting to study Engineering, Health Science and Education will still need to take IELTS, however after completing EAP they will be well equipped with the language skills needed for most ELT examinations.

    • Academic writing, reading, speaking and listening
    • Academic vocabulary
    • Research skills
    • Syntax
    • Collaboration and fluency in oral academic discussions
    • Mastery of a significant proportion of the Academic Vocabulary List for universities
    • Conforming written English skills to university academic requirements
    • Development of strategies for understanding and note taking of written and spoken academic texts
    • Using citations and references in the APA Style
    • Practising critical thinking and independent study skills that are essential for successful university studies
    • Undertaking independent research
  • Design
    • Graphic Design Methodologies including Logo and Poster Design
    • Language of Design
    • Design Manipulation of Image and Text
    • Research and Enquiry of Design History and Designers
    • Self-directed Production of Design Portfolio
    • Creative Thinking and Development of Ideas
    • Editing and Decision-making
    • Layout and Presentation
  • Photography
    • Functions of the DSLR Camera
    • History and Theory of Photography
    • Language of Photography
    • Digital Manipulation of Images
    • Research and Concept Development
    • Self-Directed Project
    • Production of a Photographic Portfolio
  • Statistics
    • Probability
    • Expectation Algebra
    • Probability Distributions
    • Sampling Methods
    • Data Display
    • Calculating Statistics from a Data Set
    • Sampling Distributions
    • Confidence Intervals
    • Graphs
    • Simultaneous Equations
    • Numerical Methods
    • Linear Programming
    • Logarithmic Modelling
    • Analysis of Bivariate Data
    • Analysis of Time Series
    • Differentiation
    • Differential Equations
  • Mathematics

    Many mathematics students study both Statistics and Calculus. If you have to choose only one, Statistics is a course required for most first-year programmes at universities. This includes degrees in Accounting, Business, Health Science, Mathematics and Computer Science. If you want to study Engineering, Advanced Economics, Physics or Mathematics, you need to choose Calculus. It is important that you look at a particular programme that you intend to study at university and plan your subject choices carefully. Check the prerequisites for your degree of choice.

    Mathematics with Statistics

    This course prepares students for careers in the biological and social sciences, medicine, commerce and administration. The topics include:

    • Linear programming
    • Numerical methods for finding approximate solutions
    • Sampling
    • Data display (representing data as graphs and interpreting graphs)
    • Expectation Algebra
    • Selections and Arrangements
    • Distributions (Binomial Distribution, Poisson Distribution, Normal Distribution)
    • Bivariate Data
    • Confidence Intervals
    • Time Series

    Mathematics with Calculus

    This course prepares students for careers in the Engineering, Computer Science and Mathematics. The topics include:

    • Algebra
    • Coordinate Geometry
    • Trigonometry
    • Differentiation
    • Integration
    • Conic Sections
    • Complex Numbers
    • Differential Equations
  • Art History*
  • Painting*
  • Music*

* subject to sufficient enrolments.